Growing an Abundance of Food in the City Using Permaculture

Kat Lavers demonstrates that it is possible to produce a meaningful amount of food on a standard sized urban block at The Plummery. The entire block including the house is 280 square meters but the food producing area is only 100 square meters. 

She lives with her partner and WWOOFERS, spending only four hours a week on average maintaining the garden. The abundance comes from close observation and planting densely with a tight rotation system.

They also keep quails because there is not enough space for chickens. The quails produce eggs and nitrogen rich manure for the edible garden.  

Rather than aiming to be self-sufficient, they aim for community dependence where most of their diet comes from the Plummery or within their bioregion. 

Growing food at The Plummery is Kat Laver’s experiment on how to regain a connection to the land in the context of a city. 

Paul Hawken on Drawdown: 100 most substantive solutions to reverse global warming

This conversation is about the book “Drawdown” which is a result of Project Drawdown created by Paul Hawken. He gathered a team of seventy research fellows from twenty-two countries who are some of the finest men and women in science and public policy. They identified, measured, and modelled the one hundred most substantive solutions to reverse global warming within three decades. 

In atmospheric terms drawdown is that point in time at which greenhouse gases peak and begin to decline on a year-to-year basis. Because, even if we stopped emissions tomorrow, it would not be enough to ward off environmental disasters. We would still have a lot of work pulling the carbon out of the atmosphere.

The man asking him the questions is Damon Gameau, who directed the documentary 2040, the year forecasted in Drawdown when our lives could look really different, something worth dreaming about, if we keep scaling these solutions that already exist today.

Now we need to go through the list and engage in the solutions that are specific to where and how we live. I have to say, some of them are really exciting because they go beyond drawdown to economic and gender equality, food security, water security, energy justice, healthier lifestyles and bringing people together, building stronger communities in the process.

We shouldn’t have to pit conservation against livelihoods. Drawdown shows how our livelihoods and lifestyles can be regenerative.

Find out more about Project Drawdown here https://www.drawdown.org 

Find out more about the film 2040 directed by Damon Gameau here https://whatsyour2040.com